Pupil Premium Grant 2021-23

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils. 

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school. The total budgeted for this year is £190,300.

School overview

School name

The Leigh UTC

Number of pupils in school

737

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

25%

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

  • 2020/21
  • 2021/22
  • 2022/23

Date this statement was published

October 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

September 2022

Statement authorised by

Stephen Leahey

Pupil premium lead

Ben Blyth

Governor / Trustee lead

Clive Barker

Funding Overview

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£165,215

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£25,085

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

£190,300

Statement of intent

The Leigh UTC is committed to providing effective support for all disadvantaged students to improve their academic, personal and careers outcomes. As an Academy, we believe that all our students have a right to achieve their full potential, irrespective of their socio-economic status, so that our students receive an education that offers them a ‘currency of choice’ for their futures. Students in receipt of Pupil Premium should achieve outcomes in line with, or exceeding those of their non-Pupil Premium peers both locally and nationally, so as to be afforded the same life chances in future education, training or employment.   

The most effective and proven way to use Pupil Premium funding is to ensure that all students experience high quality and inclusive lessons on a daily basis, delivered by trained, highly competent and well supported staff. We believe that high expectations of all students means high expectations of all disadvantaged students also. Therefore, The Leigh UTC ensures that our academic and extended curriculum is rigorous and accessible for all, thus allowing all students to build cultural capital and contextualise their learning in a manner that best develops and prepares them for their future careers. 

In summary:

  • Disadvantaged students will receive highly effective teaching in all lessons.
  • We focus the majority of our efforts into developing classroom practice – improved instruction is proven to raise student outcomes.
  • We firmly believe that all students are able to achieve. We believe that all students have valuable contributions to be made in all learning areas.
  • Teachers and Directors of Learning are accountable for the outcomes achieved by our disadvantaged students.
  • The Principal maintains overall responsibility for the provision and outcomes of disadvantaged students and this is reported termly to the Local Governing Body.

Challenges

The English Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD 2015) reported that Dartford ranked as the fifth most deprived area in the Kent region, having seen an increase in deprivation since the previous 2010 report (where Dartford ranked as sixth). The report indicates that students on roll are from families that likely face challenges such as income deprivation, employment deprivation and education, skills and training deprivation. This has likely been exacerbated in more recent times due to the impact of the global COVID-19 pandemic.

Whilst there is no specific profile of a student in receipt of Pupil Premium funding, research suggests that such students are more likely to experience the following, when compared to their non-Pupil Premium peers:

  • difficulty attending school / maintaining high attendance
  • unsupportive parents or carers in terms of education / school culture
  • parents / carers that have reduced or unrealistic expectations
  • parents / carers that are uncertain as to how best support their child(ren)
  • reduced cultural capital
  • low aspirations / self-worth / self-confidence
  • low levels of literacy / numeracy / oracy
  • difficulty working independently and managing personal deadlines
  • a lack of basic equipment to fully access and engage with learning
  • a warped view of the local community and their role within the community

Challenge 1

Low prior attainment in English and Maths demonstrate poor literacy and numeracy skills, particularly within Key Stage 3.

Challenge 2

Below expected chronological reading ages across Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4.

Challenge 3

Non-academic barriers present outside of school impact on attendance, behaviour and motivation of students.

Challenge 4

Low levels of parental / carer engagement with the school and a student’s educational experience.

Challenge 5

Students attend school without appropriate equipment to access and engage with learning.

Intended Outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Students in receipt of Pupil Premium to achieve progress in line with non-Pupil Premium locally and nationally (measured through internal and LAT assessment points in Key Stage 3 and in GCSE outcomes in Key Stage 4) in core subjects.

By the end of our current strategy plan in 2022/23, students in receipt of Pupil Premium shall:

  • Achieve progress in line with non-Pupil Premium peers in English at both Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 both locally and nationally.
  • Achieve progress in line with non-Pupil Premium peers in Mathematics at both Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 both locally and nationally.
  • Achieve progress in line with non-Pupil Premium peers in Science at both Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 both locally and nationally.

Students in receipt of Pupil Premium to make progress in developing their reading age to expected chronological age.

By the end of our current strategy plan in 2022/23, all students in receipt of Pupil Premium shall be assessed as reading at their chronological age. This will enable them to engage in all learning activities.

Students in receipt of Pupil Premium to achieve and maintain attendance of 96% in line with the Academy’s Attendance Policy.

By the end of our current strategy plan in 2022/23, all students in receipt of Pupil Premium shall have a maintained absence of 96% or higher.

Parents and carers of students in receipt of Pupil Premium will have achieved destinations of Education, Employment or Training by their exit point.

The Leigh UTC will maintain a 100% success rate – that no students in receipt of Pupil Premium are considered NEETs (Not in Education, Employment or Training) each year that the current strategy plan is active.

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £6000

Activity 1

Collaborative learning approaches

Evidence that supports this approach

The impact of collaborative learning has a consistently positive impact in all core subjects, especially in Literacy, Mathematics and Science. These approaches also benefit those students with low prior attainment.

Collaborative Learning Approaches | Education Endowment Foundation

Challenge number(s) addressed

1 and 2

Activity 2

Feedback

Evidence that supports this approach

The impact of effective feedback is well-evidence to have a highly positive impact on learning at all stages. Effective feedback has high impact across all subject areas and for all students although low attaining pupils tend to benefit from more explicit feedback strategies than high attainers. Effective feedback supports parents and carers in supporting their child(ren) as learners.

Feedback | Education Endowment Foundation

Challenge number(s) addressed

1, 2 and 4

Activity 3

Homework

Evidence that supports this approach

The impact of effective feedback is well-evidence to have a highly positive impact on learning at all stages. Effective feedback has high impact across all subject areas and for all students although low attaining pupils tend to benefit from more explicit feedback strategies than high attainers. Effective feedback supports parents and carers in supporting their child(ren) as learners.

Feedback | Education Endowment Foundation

Challenge number(s) addressed

1, 2, 3 and 4

Activity 4

Mastery learning

Evidence that supports this approach

Whilst sometimes challenging to implement, a combination of direct instruction and collaborative learning approaches (see above) is an effective strategy for our students. Ensuring all students have mastered 80% of curriculum content means that students do not progress with gaps or misconceptions.

Mastery Learning | Education Endowment Foundation

Challenge number(s) addressed

1 and 2

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £56,500

Activity 1

Mentoring

Evidence that supports this approach

Mentoring has maintained a positive impact for our students from disadvantaged backgrounds – particularly for non-academic outcomes such as attitudes to school, attendance and behaviour. Our mentoring aims to build confidence and resilience as well as raising aspirations.

Mentoring | Education Endowment Foundation

Challenge number(s) addressed

3 and 4

Activity 2

One to One Tuition

Evidence that supports this approach

Intensive individual support is very effective at improving student outcomes, particularly for students with low prior attainment or for those struggling in particular subject areas. In some cases, small group interventions are as effective when students in attendance share a similar need requirement.

One to One Tuition | Education Endowment Foundation

Challenge number(s) addressed

1 and 2

Activity 3

Reading comprehension strategies

Evidence that supports this approach

Reading comprehension strategies have a high impact when taught explicitly and consistently. These can be combined with collaborative learning strategies (see above) as well as digital learning strategies for maximum impact. Being able to read and understand text empowers all students but has the most impact for lower attaining pupils.

Reading Comprehension Strategies | Education Endowment Foundation

Challenge number(s) addressed

1, 2 and 3

Activity 4

Teaching Assistant Interventions

Evidence that supports this approach

Effective deployment of Teaching Assistants has a largely positive impact on students when used in conjunction with high quality teaching strategies. Evidence suggests that students with Special Educational Needs in receipt of Pupil Premium with access to Teaching Assistant support reports improved attitudes to education.

Teaching Assistant Interventions | Education Endowment Foundation

Challenge number(s) addressed

1 and 2

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £127,800

Activity 1

Academy Inclusion Team

Evidence that supports this approach

Every student should have a supportive relationship with a member of school staff. Understanding a pupil’s context will inform effective responses so as to tailor targeted approaches to meet the individual needs of our students. Parents and carers will develop positive relationships with staff whose responsibility it is to actively support their child(ren).

Challenge number(s) addressed

2, 3, 4 and 5

Activity 2

Emotional Literacy Support Assistants

Evidence that supports this approach

Students require support to self-regulate  and to build their social and emotional resilience. Students benefit from carefully guided practice to develop independent practice, with support gradually withdrawn as the student becomes proficient. Social emotional learning focuses on the ways in which students work with (and alongside) their peers, teachers, family or community to develop a positive ethos which supports greater engagement in learning.

Challenge number(s) addressed

3

Activity 3

Uniform and Equipment

Evidence that supports this approach

School uniform policies are thought to complement the development and support of a whole school culture. identity and approach, which in turn may assist pupil discipline and motivation. It is recognised that this can be a significant cost for students from deprived backgrounds and so monies are used to subsidise and fund uniform items as necessary.

Research has found that disadvantaged pupils and their families have been worse affected by the impact of the pandemic. We expect all students to be equipped so that they can fully engage in all learning activities – this means we have prioritised funds to support those students who are unable to purchase school supplies and equipment.

Challenge number(s) addressed

5

Activity 4

Sports Clubs

Evidence that supports this approach

The average impact of engagement with physical activities on academic progress is only slightly positive, but the wider benefits related to health and wellbeing are directly linked to improved attendance and retention. 

Physical Activity | Education Endowment Foundation

Challenge number(s) addressed

3

Activity 5

Behaviour Interventions

Evidence that supports this approach

Approaches that focus on self-management are associated with greater impact. The Department of Education reports that students in receipt of Free School Meals are more likely to receive a permanent or fixed period exclusion for persistent disruptive behaviour. Students require specialist support to help manage their self-regulation or social and emotional skills.

Behaviour Interventions | Education Endowment Foundation

Challenge number(s) addressed

3

Review of activity from the last academic year

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

Externally provided programmes

Programme

Provider

MyON elibrary

Renaissance

Hegarthy Maths licence

Hegarthy Maths

Mastery: Writing English KS3

Ark Curriculum Plus

Mastery: Maths

Ark Curriculum Plus

Y10/Y11 KS4 Science

Tassomai LTD

 MyTutor online tutoring

MyTutor LTD